Hickory

hickoryGeneral:  Grown throughout the eastern United States.  Pecan is almost always included in this description.

Description:  Hickory is among the hardest and strongest of woods native to the United States.  The sapwood of hickory is white, tinged with brown, while the heartwood is pale to reddish brown. The wood is known for its strength and shock resistance.he hickories are an important group within the Eastern hardwood forests. Botanically they are split into two groups; the true hickories, and the pecan hickories (fruit bearing). The wood is virtually the same for both and is usually sold together. Hickory is the hardest, heaviest and strongest American wood. The sapwood of hickory is white, tinged with inconspicuous fine brown lines while the heartwood is pale to reddish brown. Both are coarse-textured and the grain is fine, usually straight but can be wavy or irregular.

Workability:  Difficult to work, with tearout being common during machining operations if cutting edges are not kept sharp; the wood tends to blunt cutting edges. Glues, stains, and finishes well. Responds well to steam bending.  The heaviest of American hardwoods, the hickories can be difficult to machine and glue, and are very hard to work with hand tools, so care is needed. They hold nails and screws well, but there is a tendency to split so pre-boring is advised. The wood can be sanded to a good finish. The grain pattern welcomes a full range of medium-to-dark finishes and bleaching treatments. It can be difficult to dry and has high shrinkage.  Difficult to work, with tearout being common during machining operations if cutting edges are not kept sharp; the wood tends to blunt cutting edges. Glues, stains, and finishes well. Responds well to steam bending.

Common Uses:  Tool handles, furniture, cabinetry, flooring, paneling, wooden ladders, dowels and sporting goods.  Tool handles, furniture, cabinetry, ladder rungs, dowels, sporting goods (including baseball bats, skis and archery equipment), flooring, veneer, plywood, fuelwood, charcoal.

SRH Stock:

Thicknesses:  4/4″ and 8/4″

Widths:  4″  through 8″

Lengths:  8 and 10′

Surfacing:  Skip planed

Hickory Links:

The Wood Datasbase

The American Hardwood Information Center